Row Repeats

In writing out the pattern for your design, you realize that you can simplify the instructions by adding a statement that a certain sequence of rows can be repeated. You've been making every effort to write in a clear, concise and comprehensive manner. You have now come to a point where introducing an element of ambiguity could be easy to do. Your words may not be interpreted as you intended.

For example:

Row 1 (RS): Sl1, knit across.

Row 2 (WS): Sl1, purl across.

Repeat rows 1 & 2 three times.

Do you intend the knitter to work 6 rows or 8 rows? By adding one word, you can clarify your repeat statement and leave the knitter knowing exactly what you intend.

Repeat rows 1 & 2 three more times.

The knitter will know that 8 rows will be worked.

Repeat rows 1 & 2 three times total.

The knitter will know that 6 rows will be worked.

 

How to write a row repeat sequence if the stitch count changes. Consider the following sequence of rows:

Row 1 (RS): K1, kfb, k3, kfb, k1. (2 sts inc)

Row 2 (WS): Purl.

Repeat rows 1 & 2 three more times.

As it is written, this would not work. There would be unworked stitches left on the first repeat of row 1 and the increase would be worked in an unintended place.

A more comprehensive way to write this would be:

Row 1 (RS): K1, kfb, k to last 2 sts, kfb, k1. (2 sts inc)

Row 2 (WS): Purl.

Repeat rows 1 & 2 three more times. (total of 8 sts inc)